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Rachel. Iowa. My heart wants to roam free around the world.
Most of the material on here doesn't belong to me...if it does, i'll say so.
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enchantedengland:

   The town of Dolgellau, in the county of Gwynedd, north-west Wales. Dolgellau is chiefly a tourist town; where the sporting, spindly athletic sort can walk, hike, horse ride, white-water raft, and climb breathtaking mountains such as Cadair Idris (aka Cader Idris) to their well-conditioned heart’s content. Dolgellau is also home to a bilingual further education college, Coleg Meirion-Dwyfor, where most subjects can be studied entirely in Welsh.  (image by bara-koukoug on Flickr)
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enchantedengland:

  EEEEEEEE look at this magical fairytale glen!!! This is in Betws-y-Coed (“Prayer house in the wood”), Welsh pronunciation: [ˈbɛtʊs ə ˈkɔɨd]) a little village in the Conwy valley of Conwy Borough, Wales. The town was founded around a monastery in the late sixth century. (image edwina bullock on beautyineverything.com)
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enchantedengland:

   Conwy Castle (Welsh: Castell Conwy) is situated in county Conwy on the northwest of Wales. The castle was built on a rock promontory, between 1283-1289, using 1500 labourers and stonemasons; during King Edward I’s second campaign in Wales.
  Can you even imagine being part of the construction of this? SIX YEARS of hauling stones and climbing turrets and grumbling about in the rain with 1500 other equally dire-smelling, foul-mouthed, sullen fellows. Somebody probably scratched Ffyc fy mywyd (that’s FML in Welsh according to google translator) more than once on the side of a rampart.  But then when it’s finished, everyone stands back cheering and you think ‘I helped build THAT.’ It must’ve been a pretty epic feeling. (image by L Sessions on parnoramio) 
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enchantedengland:

    The Smallest House in Great Britain, also known as the Quay House, resides on the quay in Conwy(a walled market town on the north coast) Wales. Built in the 16th century, and inhabited until 1900, the residence is 3 metres by 1.8 metres (10 foot by 6 foot) in size. (You can visit for £2.50.) The Welsh lady stands outside most days, according to the sources I perused, although no one seems to know why. (image by LSessions on beautyineverything)
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enchantedengland:

   Baron Hill Manor (image cropped & resized) now a ruin, was built as an estate in 1618 and named after the hill on which it stands. Baron Hill is on the Isle of Anglesey, (Ynys Mon in Welsh) the largest of Wales’ islands. It’s so large it is also a county. You may recall this is where Prince William and Kate Middleton chose to reside after their honeymoon. (Not HERE at this Manor, now. On the island). 
   (from special effects on beautyineverything)
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enchantedengland:

   Portmeirion is a colourful, Mediterannean-styled village in Gwynedd, North Wales; designed and built by Sir Clough William-Ellis between 1925-1975 in the style of an Italian village. This place is fantastically gorgeous and I am frenetically digging about for the best images there are of it. (photo by royaldds on beautyineverything.com)
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enchantedengland:

   This image depicts only a portion of the enormous Penrhyn Castle in Bangor, Gwynedd, north Wales. The Castle was originally a medieval fortified manor house, reconstructed in the nineteenth century in a picturesque Norman fashion. The National Trust promises us the Castle is “crammed with fascinating items”, including a one-ton slate bed made for Queen Victoria (sounds comfy) elaborate carvings, plasterwork, mock-Norman furniture, and a great giant collection of paintings.
   (image is by Candid Obscura on beautyineverything.com) 
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enchantedengland:

   A typical Welsh timbre-framed sixteenth century cottage; from welshlady on flickr. I want to live in every cottage I post. I need a long, winding, cobblestoned street lined with all of them, and I would OWN THE STREET! That’s what I need.
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Rudolph the Green Nosed Reindeer (Can you see him?) by Cj Roberts on Flickr.